ARCHIVES

 

FROM THE ARCHIVES

 
 
  Photo: Najlah Feanny/Corbis;   Illustration: Sean McCabe  

Photo: Najlah Feanny/Corbis; Illustration: Sean McCabe  

NEW YORK MAGAZINE: THE HEIST (03/24/2008)

How Jamie Dimon resisted the quick and dirty temptations of Wall Street and put himself in perfect position for the deal, or maybe steal, of the century.

 
  Photograph by Rick Loomis/Los Angeles Times

Photograph by Rick Loomis/Los Angeles Times

VANITY FAIR: THE ARTIST FORMERLY KNOWN AS PAUL FRANK (August 2006)

Since its inception in 1995, Paul Frank Industries has sold $100 million worth of its cute but edgy clothes and accessories. Late last year, however, it lost the allegiance of Paul Frank himself, the design savant whose quirky creations, starting with Julius the monkey, gave birth to the brand itself. As Frank and his erstwhile partners trade allegations of disrespect, disengagement, and wedding-day slights in a battle for millions of dollars, the question arises: Which Paul Frank—the man or the company—is to blame?

 
 Conrad Black and Barbara Amiel arrive at a dinner to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Annabel's nightclub, in London, September 16, 2003.  Mark Stewart/Retna Ltd.

Conrad Black and Barbara Amiel arrive at a dinner to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Annabel's nightclub, in London, September 16, 2003. Mark Stewart/Retna Ltd.

VANITY FAIR: THE MAN WHO WANTED MORE (April 2004)

Just six months ago, his panache and erudition evident in his new biography of F.D.R., right-wing press baron Conrad Black was momentarily the toast of New York, London, and Toronto, his dazzling columnist wife, Barbara Amiel, at his side. Today, accused of taking millions from his Hollinger International conglomerate, he has lost control of an empire that includes London's Telegraph, the Chicago Sun-Times, and The Jerusalem Post, dragging big-name board members such as Henry Kissinger, Richard Perle, and Alfred Taubman into a legal mire.